Section Menu

Course Descriptions

Course NumberCourse Title and DescriptionCredit Hours
DPT 1620Clinical Applications – Health Promotion
The Clinical Applications course series uses case scenarios to develop the student’s psychomotor and clinical decision making skills. This first Clinical Applications course centers on the ability of the practitioner to obtain the data needed from a client/patient interview to determine a course of action. Case topics focus on the screening tools used and program planning for the prevention and health promotion needs of the client. The integration of massage theory and practice and palpation are also major components of this course. Successful completion of the American Heart Association Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers (CPR & AED) Program is required to pass this course.
1.5
DPT 1621Clinical Applications – Musculoskeletal Lower Quadrant
The case scenarios used in this second course within the clinical applications series will develop the foundational skills needed for practice. The course includes cases to develop examination skills in goniometry, manual muscle testing, and sensory testing. Transfer training and the safe use of assistive gait devices are also included within the course content. The application of various biophysical agents is also a major component of this course. The determination of a diagnosis and prognosis for a variety of diverse client / patient problems are done via case presentations in a small group setting. Cases include client / patient with lower quadrant musculoskeletal disorders. The student will also be assigned lab time within a clinical setting to observe patient care.
2.0
DPT 1640Research Design and Statistics: 
The need to make clinical decisions based on the application of evidence requires an understanding of the fundamentals of research methods and analysis.  The course is the first in a series of two geared to providing a framework for the integration of evidence into clinical practice.  Focus within this course is on basics of research design and implementation.  The latter portion of this course focuses on statistical methods and their application in the health care literature.  The procedures for meta-analysis will also be introduced.
2.0
DPT 1641Epidemiology and Evidence Based Practice:
This course focuses on the basic concept of epidemiology and biostatics to assist in making evidence based health care decisions. The health care provider is faced with a vast wealth of data that must be sifted within a short course of time. An understanding of data summaries, population descriptions, risk classification, predictive statistics and outcomes is critical. The application of research fundamentals into clinical practice is the center of this course. Using the framework of the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) model the participant will actively engage in the evaluation of available information to determine the course of care.
1.0
DPT 1650Foundational Sciences – Anatomy
The Gross Anatomy course provides an in-depth study of the human body. One of the unique privileges in the anatomy course will be to dissect a human body. Special emphasis is placed on developmental anatomy and normal radiographic anatomy. Students will be expected to have a thorough understanding of gross anatomy, neuroanatomy, select embryology, and radiographic anatomy of the human body.  This course will also include clinical correlation labs which coincide with the area of the body being studied.
9.0
DPT 1651Foundational Sciences – Health Promotion
This Foundational Sciences course addresses the underlying physiological issues related to health and well-being. The physiology of the musculoskeletal, cardiac, respiratory and immune systems is covered. The physiological responses to exercise for health are addressed.
4.0
DPT 1652Foundational Sciences – Musculoskeletal Lower Quadrant
The focus of the Foundational Sciences in this term is introduction to general biomechanics, tissue mechanics, and biomechanics of the lower quadrant. This includes the lumbar spine, pelvis/sacrum and the lower extremity. Gait, locomotion and pharmacology are primary topics. Pain pathways and mechanisms are presented.
4.5
DPT 1660Patient Management – Health Promotion
Implementation of the patient management model as outlined in the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice begins with this course. This course concentrates on the provision of services that promote the health and quality of life within diverse patient populations. Fundamentals of nutrition and nutritional issues related to clinical practice are also covered.
2.0
DPT 1661Patient Management – Musculoskeletal Lower Quadrant
This is the second course in the patient management series. This course focuses on the management and care of patients with impairments in body function and structure, activity limitations or participation restrictions related to the lower quadrant. Principles of differential diagnosis are introduced. Fundamental handling skills are presented, including gait training, body mechanics, and positioning. Students are expected to make clinical decisions regarding patient intervention based on the evaluation of gathered data. Safe and efficient applications of procedural interventions specific to musculoskeletal system impairments are taught. This course also presents information related to the pharmacologic, medical, and surgical management of patients with musculoskeletal dysfunction.
8.0
DPT 1680Health Promotion and Prevention Practicum
This two week practicum is designed for students to have opportunities to participate in the development, implementation, and assessment of community prevention, health promotion, fitness, and wellness programs for individuals, groups, and communities.  Students gain experience to design and execute programs that promote optimal health throughout the lifespan by providing information or consultation on many aspects of health risks and disability.  Students complete practicum experiences in a variety of settings from school systems, community and corporate wellness centers, hospital and clinic-based specialty services to non-profit organizations.
2.0
DPT 1690Professional Issues and Development 1
This is the first course in a series of Professional Issues and Development courses. The initial portion of the course covers orientation to the Doctor of Physical Therapy Program and to the profession of physical therapy. The remainder of the course is designed to introduce the student to issues concerned with personal and professional behaviors. The primary focus will be on student growth and development. The prevention and health promotion needs of a diverse population are also core components of this course. Health care models and beliefs, motivational strategies, and educational theory are presented with a focus toward the needs of individual clients. Community resources and consultation services will be discussed. Scopes of practice issues are presented. Students begin the process of developing communication skills needed to establish a therapeutic relationship with their clients.
2.5
DPT 1691Professional Issues and Development 2
The second course in the Professional Issues and Development series is designed to address some psychosocial and practice aspects related to clinical practice. Clinical learning and education will encompass theoretical and practical applications. They include patient/client education, health literacy concepts, documentation applications, and clinical education models. Lifespan issues related to health and wellness from birth to death, including physical, psychological, social, and economic aspects will be introduced. Life stages from prenatal, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, and late adulthood will be covered, with an emphasis on issues relevant to the practice of physical therapy.
1.0
DPT 2622AClinical Applications – Musculoskeletal Upper Quadrant 1
The case scenarios used in this third course within the clinical applications series will focus on the evaluation and interventions associated with head, cervical and thoracic spine dysfunction. The course includes cases that continue to develop examination skills. The determination of a diagnosis, prognosis and plan of care for a variety of diverse client / patient problems are done via case presentations. The application of various biophysical agents is also major component of this course. Students will be required to participate in a DMU sponsored community screening.
1.0
DPT 2622BClinical Applications – Musculoskeletal Upper Quadrant 2
This fourth course within the clinical applications series is a continuation of DPT 2622A and will focus on the evaluation and interventions associated with upper extremity dysfunction. The course includes cases that continue to develop examination and intervention skills. The determination of a diagnosis, prognosis and plan of care for a variety of diverse client / patient problems are done via case presentations.
0.5
DPT 2623Clinical Applications – Neuromuscular Systems
This clinical applications course continues to concentrate on the acquisition of clinical decision making and psychomotor skills related to direct patient care. Cases include clients/patients with movement system issues related to neuromuscular or cardiovascular/pulmonary disorders. Cultural diversity, developmental considerations, and effects of aging are taken into account.  Various patient and clinical labs will be conducted both on and off of the DMU campus.
2.5
DPT 2630Clinical Internship 1
This ten week supervised clinical internship is designed to provide students with experiences in direct patient management of the patient with musculoskeletal disorders. Students will integrate the five elements of patient management: examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis and intervention. Patient caseloads during the clinical internship may vary by student and facility and could range from specialty clinics to general hospitals.
0.0
DPT 2653AFoundational Sciences – Musculoskeletal Upper Quadrant 1
The foundational sciences series continues with the biomechanics and function of the cervical and thoracic spine, and TMJ. Geriatrics and normal development of the newborn through year one are primary topics. The course also includes Part 1 of an evidence based practice group project, where the students are expected to propose, refine and perform literature searches in order to identify pertinent literature in support of a systematic review manuscript to be completed during the fall term.
2.5
DPT 2653BFoundational Sciences – Musculoskeletal Upper Quadrant 2
The foundational sciences series continues with the biomechanics and function of the upper extremity. The course also includes an evidence based practice group project, where the students are expected to organize literature findings and synthesize evidence in the form of a systematic review manuscript.
1.0
DPT 2654Foundational Sciences – Neuromuscular Systems
This foundational sciences course focuses on the neurosciences related to higher order functions. Topics covered include the special senses and the limbic system. It includes material on normal physical and cognitive development from birth to death. A significant amount of the course work involves participation in scholarly activities.
3.0
DPT 2662APatient Management – Musculoskeletal Upper Quadrant 1
This is the third course of the patient management series. This course focuses on the management and care of a client/patient with impairments, activity limitations and participation restrictions related to the head, and cervical/thoracic musculoskeletal systems. Principles of differential diagnosis are introduced. The student is expected to make clinical judgments regarding clients/patients intervention based on the evaluation of data gathered. The safe and efficient application of procedural interventions specific to musculoskeletal system impairments is covered. The course also includes content related to the pharmacologic, medical, and surgical management of the client/patient with musculoskeletal pathologies within these areas. Occupational medicine concepts are also covered within this course.
5.0
DPT 2662BPatient Management – Musculoskeletal Upper Quadrant 2
This fourth course within the patient management series is a continuation of DPT 2662A. The focus is on the management and care of a client/patient with impairments, activity limitations and participation restrictions related to the upper extremity. The student is expected to make clinical judgments regarding clients/patients intervention based on the evaluation of data gathered. The safe and efficient application of procedural interventions specific to musculoskeletal system impairments is covered. The course also includes content related to the pharmacologic, medical, and surgical management of the client/patient with upper extremity musculoskeletal pathologies.
3.0
DPT 2663Patient Management – Cardiopulmonary Systems
The patient management of clients/patients with cardiovascular/pulmonary disorders is the key content of this course. The course will present course work related to the pharmacologic, medical, and surgical management of the client/patient with cardiovascular/pulmonary pathologies. Evaluation and intervention procedures within ICU and acute care environments will also be a focus. Cultural diversity, developmental considerations, and effects of aging are taken into account as the material of this course is presented.
3.0
DPT 2664Patient Management – Neuromuscular Systems
The patient management of clients/patients with neuromuscular disorders is the key content of this course. The physical therapy and medical management of pediatric and geriatric patient is also a major component. Cultural diversity, developmental considerations, and effects of aging are taken into account as the material of this course is presented. The course will also present course work related to the pharmacologic, medical, and surgical management of the client/patient with neuromuscular pathologies.
7.0
DPT 2692AProfessional Issues and Development 3
The professional issues and development series continues with content related to regulatory and reimbursement issues.
0.5
DPT 2692BProfessional Issues and Development 4
The professional issues and development series continues with content related to ethical issues associated with client/patient care. Emphasis will be placed on ethical considerations related to direct patient care and patient rights.
1.0
DPT 2693Professional Issues and Development 5
The fifth course in the Professional Issues and Development series covers a wide range of topics. Information is presented specific to employer-employee relations such as recruitment and retention practices, job descriptions, performance appraisals, development of a professional resume, and job interviewing strategies.  Practice management topics of best practice, history of health care, and case management are also covered.  Additional material related to governmental and advocacy factors which influence the current and future delivery of health care and the implications for physical therapy practice are presented.  Students are introduced to current professional topics by participation in a Mock House of Delegates.
2.5
DPT 3610Civic Engagement
The purpose of this civic engagement course is to encourage the development of physical therapists as socially responsible professionals with greater awareness of community resources. The reflective practitioner will internalize an appreciation for the value of service. The experiences that are associated with this course are varied. Service in three categories is required a) to the Community, b) to the Profession, and c) to the University. The design of an individual students plan should reflect a desire to move beyond the comfort zone. Projects involving underserviced or diverse populations are encouraged. Equally, active participation and taking leadership roles with University, professional or community organizations is also noteworthy. “The Science of Healing – The Art of Caring” should be more than just a tagline.
1.0
DPT 3631Clinical Internship 2
This ten week supervised clinical internship is designed to provide students with experiences in direct patient management of the patient with cardiopulmonary (acute care), musculoskeletal, and/or neuromuscular disorders. Students will integrate the five elements of patient management: examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis and intervention. Patient caseloads during the clinical internship may vary by student and facility and could range from specialty clinics to general hospitals. Students may fulfill an elective requirement during this ten week internship.
0.0
DPT 3632Clinical Internship 3
The final clinical experiences include two eight-week clinical internships. These internships are designed to provide students with experiences in direct patient management of the patient with cardiopulmonary (acute care), musculoskeletal, and/or neuromuscular disorders. Students will integrate the five elements of patient management: examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis and intervention. Patient caseloads during the clinical internship may vary by student and facility and could range from specialty clinics to general hospitals.  Students may fulfill an elective requirement during one of these eight week internships.
8.0
DPT 3633Clinical Internship 4
The final clinical experiences include two eight-week clinical internships. These internships are designed to provide students with experiences in direct patient management of the patient with cardiopulmonary (acute care), musculoskeletal, and/or neuromuscular disorders. Students will integrate the five elements of patient management: examination, evaluation, diagnosis, prognosis and intervention. Patient caseloads during the clinical internship may vary by student and facility and could range from specialty clinics to general hospitals.  Students may fulfill an elective requirement during one of these eight week internships.
8.0
DPT 3670Practice Topics
Topics within this course include women’s health, pain management, and integumentary disorders. Clinical medicine topics cover the renal, gastrointestinal, endocrine systems and infectious disease. Thrust manipulation is a key focus. Complimentary therapies such as yoga, tai chi, cranial sacral therapy, and myofascial release are introduced.  Additional therapeutic exercise strategies will also be included. Material will be covered by using traditional lab and lecture presentations as well as case based learning with an emphasis on clinical decision making in patient management and efficient use of resources. Successful completion of the American Heart Association Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers (CPR & AED) program is required to pass this course.
0.0
DPT 3694Professional Issues and Development 6
This is the final course in the Professional Issues and Development series. Students will be exposed to business development and skills needed to expand or start up a physical therapy practice.  Management and compliance programs as well as legal aspects of health care as related to the delivery of physical therapy services are also addressed. Other topics related to clinical reasoning, career development, cultural diversity, and professional development are discussed.
3.5

Elective Courses

Course NumberCourse Title and DescriptionCredit Hours
INST 2003Cranial Nerves – A Case-Based Approach
This elective neuroanatomy course is designed to provide an understanding of the structure and function of the cranial nerves and the main neurological deficits resulting from cranial nerve lesions through clinical case discussions. It is assumed that the student taking this course will have a reasonable working knowledge of the structure and function of the cranial nerves. This is not a review course, but is intended to serve as a supplement to the DO-DPM Neuroanatomy course, DPT Neuroanatomy course and PA Neurologic System.
1.0
INST 2017Spiritual/Religious Issues Elective
This elective is designed to facilitate greater comfort, confidence and competence in exploring and discussing difficult existential issues of life with patients and colleagues.  Many of these have religious and spiritual dimensions, and all are pertinent to sensitive and effective patient care.  Topics include recognizing and responding to spiritual distress; the spiritual challenge of illness; responding to questions of meaning; models of spiritual assessment; understanding and responding to the effects of trauma and evil; lessons learned from those wounded by war; elements of healing learned from indigenous cultures; and caring for the patient, family and the body at the end of life.
1.0
INST 2020Beginning Medical Spanish
Introduces the student to basic Spanish vocabulary, Spanish medical vocabulary, comprehension and sentence structure. Intended for students who have little or no proficiency in conversational Spanish.
1.0
INST 2023Intermediate Medical Spanish
The purpose of this course is to teach communication with Spanish-speaking patients in order to form strong clinician-patient rapport.  Students will learn a standardized universal Spanish that also includes many words and expressions that take on different meanings in different countries and regions.  Latino patients will come from a variety of countries, education levels, socio-economic backgrounds and origins (whether urban or rural areas). This class will address some of those differences.
1.0
INST 2024Animal-Assisted Therapy and the Use of Service Animals
The goal of this course is to acquaint future health care professionals with the wide variety of ways animals are used in animal-assisted activities, animal-assisted therapy, and as service animals in both physical and psychological support roles. The students will, through outside reading, class demonstrations, discussion, etc., obtain a deeper understanding of the value and ethics of using an animal as part of therapy. The course will meet for six or seven two-hour on-campus sessions and make an off-campus trip to a hippotherapy center.
1.0
INST 2026Problem-Based Anatomy
The problem-based anatomy course is designed for students who desire a greater appreciation of the clinical relevance of anatomy and will be of educational utility to the student preparing for board examinations. The course will utilize lecture and discussion to guide students through selected clinical vignettes from the text, Problem-Based Anatomy. Each clinical vignette provides an educational framework in which the student can apply his or her anatomical knowledge to clinical situations. Another value-added attribute of the course is its integrated approach to the field of anatomy. Therefore, wherever appropriate the clinical vignettes will explore the various subdisciplines of anatomy. These include anatomic pathology, cell biology, embryology, gross anatomy, histology, neuroanatomy and radiologic anatomy.
1.0
INST 2030Reproductive Health Choices
Offered in partnership with Planned Parenthood of the Heartland as education and training for possible internships. Training will cover reproductive health and available reproduction options. Trainers from Planned Parenthood, under the supervision of the coordinator, will present the course material.
1.0
INST 2038Research in Physical Therapy
This course is designed to introduce students to conducting research in Physical Therapy.  Students must have a faculty mentor agree to supervise them prior to enrolling in the course.  Students who choose a research elective are generally expected to take a total of four research electives with their faculty mentor over their course of student in the Doctor of Physical Therapy program.
1.0
INST 2042Book Club on Disability Awareness
On-line and student-directed, this course for Physical Therapy students will span 10 weeks.  Small groups will select an autobiography or biography of an individual with physical disability and discuss through a dialogue on the learning management system.  The purpose of the course is to enhance the student’s understanding and perception of how individuals with disability recover and return to life tasks and reflect on how this understanding impacts their relationship with patients and care givers.  Student groups will set their timelines and lead the group discussions.  A pre and post-course survey/evaluation are required.
1.0
INST 2055Developing Leadership in Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapy
This elective is designed for students considering continuing their education in orthopaedic manual physical therapy beyond entry-level through residency and/or fellowship training.  Students will be mentored in a small group environment to learn and refine hands-on skills in thrust and non-thrust manipulation while participating in leadership activities akin to those required of residents and fellows. Leadership activities will include developing an evidence-based newsletter for patients or physicians; providing an evidence-based manual therapy in-service or contributing to an online evidence-based physical therapy resource; and serving as a peer reviewer for classmates’ evidence-based manual therapy projects.
1.0
INST 2058Stroke Camp
The course will allow third-year Physical Therapy students to provide intensive physical therapy to a small group of community dwelling individuals, post-stroke.  The small group setting will allow prompt feedback to students regarding their skill set from supervising therapists.  While the focus will be on physical therapy, given the team aspect of rehab care, incorporation of occupational and speech therapy and therapeutic recreation will be considered.
2.0
INST 2066Foundational Manual Skills
Peer Teaching: This course is a platform by which the participant will continue to develop competence in performing fundamental manual skills related to the practice of physical therapy. The course uses a learn-teach-learn model of instruction. The student will be asked to learn a skill, then teach that skill to others, and then critically analyze their performance in order to improve. The students will be asked to assist in teaching muscle performance and joint motion measurement, abdominal exam, head and neck exam, and sensory testing. Each student will be assigned a small group of first year PT students (four – eight) as a teaching/learning team.
1.0
INST 2067Interprofessional Simulation in Emergency Situations
This course brings together two important aspects of training future Doctoral Physical Therapy (DPT) students.  The first aspect is to provide an opportunity for DPT and Nursing students to collaborate with each other in a simulated healthcare experience focused on emergency situations. Through this collaboration, DPT students will be able to refine communication skills with nursing students and patient simulators.  DPT students will be able to learn from, with and about each other with nursing, in simulated emergency situations. In addition, this activity provides an opportunity for the DPT students to work with high fidelity simulators to refine skills.
1.0
INST 2078APractical Foundations for Medical Education
This course will provide students with the opportunity to explore the fundamentals of education including learning theory, assessment, lesson design, and self-evaluation through group discussion and reflective writing. Practice developing and implementing your own engaging lessons utilizing active learning approaches. Understand and be able to justify instructional choices.  Prepare yourself for a career in academia by developing a robust teaching philosophy statement and the skills and knowledge necessary to continually improve your teaching practice.
1.5
INST 2078BApplications of Practical Foundations for Medical Education
This course will provide students with the opportunity to apply the concepts they learned in the pre-requisite course, Practical Foundations for Medical Education (INST 2078A).  Students will complete lesson objective writing, design and implement educational experiences, and create student learning assessment tools.  Students will develop and direct tutorial sessions for their peers in a manner congruent with their academic program’s curriculum. Prerequisite: INST 2078A
1.0
INST 2079Yoga as Medicine
This course explores the concept of integrative medicine by using yoga as a healing art.  The biopsychosocial model of patient care will be incorporated in studying yoga’s neurophysiology and biomechanics and its Eastern traditions of meditation, asana, and pranayama.   Experiential knowledge is key in the understanding and practice of yoga; therefore, participants will be required to practice asana (physical postures), meditation, and pranayama (yogic breathing) throughout the course.  No experience in yoga is necessary and the course is open to all students, face-to-face students, student in online programs, and students on clinical rotations and internships as well as faculty and staff.
1.0