Friday recipe: roasted Brussels sprouts with quinoa and cranberries

December 13, 2013 —

Okay, don’t give me that look. You know what I’m talking about – that disdainful, repulsed grimace when you read that today’s recipe involved Brussels sprouts. That’s because you’re having flashbacks to the lunchroom ladies or aunties or health freaks who served them to you boiled, sodden, smelly and pretty much the LAST thing you wanted to put in your mouth.

Do not fear the sprouts.

Do not fear the sprouts.

Whoa. Take a deep breath. Then come away from the dark side and let the force of these little monster-head vegetables be with you. Known for their ability to enhance DNA repair in cells and help block the continued growth of cancer cells, Brussels sprouts are one powerful member of the cabbage family. I love them roasted. Combined with quinoa and cranberries, this tasty side is a nutrition-packed dish.

Roasted Brussels sprouts with quinoa and cranberries

  • 1½ pounds Brussels sprouts
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 cup quinoa
  • 1¾ cups water
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1/3 cup toasted almonds
  • 1/3 cup dried cranberries
  • ¼ cup chopped parsley
  • 1/8 teaspoon salt
  • Pepper to taste

Dressing:

  • 2-3 cloves garlic
  • 2½ tablespoons red wine vinegar
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice (about 1 lemon)
  • 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
  • 1 teaspoon olive oil

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. Trim the bottoms off the Brussels sprouts and chop them into quarters or halves if they are little. Toss them with a tablespoon of olive oil and spread them out on a baking sheet. Roast them for 20 minutes, stirring half way, or until the sprouts are golden.

Meanwhile, rinse the quinoa in a sieve lined with cheesecloth or a few coffee filters. Cook according to package directions.

Chop the garlic and combine it with the rest of the ingredients for the dressing; mix well.

When the sprouts are done, toss them in a bowl with the cooked quinoa and the dressing. Stir so everything is well coated. Add the almonds, cranberries, parsley, salt and pepper and mix again. Serve warm or at room temperature.


Endlessly curious and easily entertained, Barb Dietrich Boose loves being a member of the friendly, fascinating DMU community and its creative communications team. The University's publications director and DMU Magazine editor, Barb is always on the hunt for story ideas, good books and new recipes to try out on her family, such as her surprisingly tasty pork-and-bean bars.