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College of Osteopathic Medicine News and Updates


Lionel M. S. Bissoon, D.O.’89

Bissoon was welcomed to the Board of Directors of WMX Group, Inc., parent company to The World Mercantile Exchange. After completing his education at DMU, he completed a rotating internship in medicine, one year of general surgery, and one year of aerospace medicine while serving as a flight surgeon in the U.S. Air Force. Dr. Bissoon […]

— Anna Hudson

Philip J. Meyer, D.O.’78

Meyer joined the staff of The Elaine M. Junca Women’s Imaging Centre in Lafayette, LA, as medical director. Most recently he was in practice at the Oklahoma Breast Care Center in Oklahoma City, OK. He is a board-certified diagnostics radiologist.

— Anna Hudson

William E. Crommett, D.O.’54

Crommett  is still alive at age 89. All of his male ancestors died in their 60s, but his osteopathic education has given him healthy guidelines for longevity. He and his wife, Virginia, reside in Seneca, SC.

— Anna Hudson

Just 116 years ago…

It’s hard to imagine medicine without x-rays, but the technology is a relative youngster in health care. Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen, professor of physics and director of the Physical Institute of the University of Wurzburg, Germany, stumbled on x-rays quite by accident working late one November night in 1895 in his laboratory. Today, Nov. 8, is […]

— Barb Boose

Celebrate National Radiologic Technology Week!

Yesterday, Nov. 6, marked the beginning of National Radiologic Technology Week, celebrated annually to recognize the vital work of R.T.s across the nation. According to the American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT), the celebration takes place each November to commemorate the anniversary of the x-ray’s discovery by Wilhelm Conrad Roentgen on Nov. 8, 1895. The […]

— Barb Boose

Anatomy word of the month: gluteus maximus

The most feared of all the Roman emperors? Not really! The gluteus maximus (Latin- largest of the buttock) is the muscle mass making up most of the buttocks. Contrary to popular opinion, we do not sit on these muscles, because they move aside laterally as we sit. Actually, we sit on our pelvic bones protected with […]

— Bill Dyche

Learn how elite athletes maximize performance

Want to learn how the cardiovascular system works during exercise and how it responds to exercise training? Want to explore the unique “features” that allow elite athletes to attain world-class performance? Then mark your calendar for tomorrow night’s Cafe Scientifique at the Science Center of Iowa: Julia Moffitt, Ph.D., associate professor in DMU’s department of […]

— Barb Boose

Anatomy word of the month: duodenum

“Twelve each” in Latin. The duodenum is the first section of the small intestine attached to the outlet of the stomach, the pylorus. Early anatomists measured it as approximately twelve fingers’ breadths long. Duodecim is the number 12 in Latin. Take the Latin number, pass it through old French dozaine into modern English, and you have “dozen”!

— Bill Dyche

COM pass rates set new high

The COM class of 2011 students recorded the best scores ever for Des Moines University on the national licensing exam. The first-time pass rate on the Cognitive Evaluation exam was 94%, best in the nation. On the Performance Evaluation exam, the first-time pass rate was 99%, which tied for second in the country. COM students […]

— Jordan Bahnsen

Going bananas!

Many scholars think it was what got Adam and Eve kicked out of the Garden of Eden. It’s wreaked havoc in nature and among laborers on plantations in Central America and beyond. Today, Americans eat more of them than the number of apples and oranges combined: Yes, the humble banana is all this and more […]

— Barb Boose

Anatomy word of the month: atlas

The atlas is the first, or top, vertebra of our bony spinal column supporting the “globe” of the head.  In Greek mythology, Atlas was one of the early gods, called the Titans.  Atlas warred against Zeus, King of the Olympian gods, and lost.  For his punishment, Atlas was condemned to bear the weight of the world and heavens […]

— Bill Dyche

How can you keep them down on the farm?

American Medical News recently explored the increasing shortage of physicians in rural areas and the efforts of medical schools to address it. A July report by UnitedHealth’s Center for Health Reform and Modernization noted that five million American residents live in counties with fewer than 33 primary care physicians per 100,000 residents, and about 27 […]

— Barb Boose

Happy birthday to A.T. Still!

Today marks A.T. Still’s 182nd birthday. He is known as the father of osteopathic medicine. Osteopathy is a whole body approach to health that recognizes the integral role in wellbeing played by the musculoskeletal system. We are very proud to be the second oldest osteopathic medical schools in the United States. Learn more about what […]

— Courtney Tompkins

Anatomy word of the month: coronary

The coronary arteries encircle the heart “like a crown” which is its literal meaning in Latin.  The coronaries supply blood to the heart muscle itself.  Blockage of a branch of a coronary artery causes a “heart attack” in layman’s language.  The same root meaning is found in coronation and coroner.  The latter word originally referred to an official appointed […]

— Bill Dyche

Goin’ for the Gold

Back in the 1990s, when medical educators and residency program directors expressed the need to recognize internship and residency applicants with both outstanding clinical and interpersonal skills, the Arnold P. Gold Foundation listened. That led to the creation of the Gold Humanism Honor Society (GHHS), which honors select medical students, residents, role-model physician teachers and […]

— Barb Boose

Freaky foods

When it comes to new technological developments, some of the strangest ones involve food. For example, the Daily Telegraph recently reported that scientists at Maastricht University in the Netherlands are working to produce a real hamburger that doesn’t require slaughtering any animals: The Dutch scientists say the “vitro meat,” made from beef mince grown from […]

— Barb Boose

A provocative day

At DMU, our faculty believe research is vital, and students are vital to research. A demonstration of that belief is DMU’s mentored student research program, which gives student researchers the opportunity to share highlights of their findings. They will present their research today in DMU’s Olsen Medical Education Center (better known as the MEC) in […]

— Barb Boose