Blog News and Updates

RAGBRAI rolls next week

Turning 50 is hard for some, but it was even more thought-provoking for Brian Hart because of the gift his wife, Julie, gave him: a brand new bicycle. “I wasn’t as appreciative as I probably should have been,” says the owner of Hart Financial, LLC, and a member of the DMU Board of Trustees. Something […]

— Barb Boose

Research is vital

Research is vital, and at DMU students are vital to research. The Mentored Student Research Program is an excellent opportunity for students to highlight their research findings. They will present their research on Friday, July 20 in DMU’s Olsen Medical Education Center (better known as the MEC) in an event that’s free and open to the public. It begins with […]

— Nicole Branstad

Anatomy word of the month: Buccinator

The “trumpeter” in Latin. Our cheek muscles, the buccinator, assist the tongue during chewing movements to hold food between our teeth. Otherwise food would accumulate between our cheek and gums making chewing much less efficient and much more frustrating to accomplish.  The buccinator muscles also hold in our cheeks during whistling and forceful blowing through […]

— Bill Dyche

A tale of two tracheas

Reporter and National Public Radio science correspondent Robert Krulwich recently shared a suspenseful and true story about a woman in Barcelona struck by tuberculosis. Rather than have her left lung removed, she agreed to receive a transplanted trachea. The woman, Claudia Castillo, would be a pioneer: She was going to receive a donated trachea that […]

— Barb Boose

Stop and drop the pop!

I don’t believe you can legislate intelligence or wise decision-making. That’s why I have mixed feelings about efforts to outlaw bad-for-us foods, such as New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s call to ban all sugary drinks larger than 16 ounces throughout the city’s restaurants, street carts and stadiums. That’s also why last week’s news from […]

— Barb Boose

Friday recipe: reuben salad

In some instances, bacteria are a good thing. And much about these microbial creatures is unknown. That’s why the National Institutes of Health has launched a comprehensive Human Microbiome Project (HMP), with “the mission of generating resources enabling comprehensive characterization of the human microbiota and analysis of their role in human health and disease.” Bacteria also […]

— Barb Boose