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Anatomy News and Updates


Job fair at DMU welcomes health professionals, students

Health care workers and students are invited to attend a job fair on September 21, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. in the Des Moines University Medical Education Center at 3200 Grand Ave. The entire event was coordinated by students in the Des Moines University (DMU) physical therapy class of 2012. Thirty to forty exhibitors […]

— Courtney Tompkins

Anatomy word of the month: eustachian tube

Most anatomical terms are descriptive in Latin or Greek. However, “Eustachian” doesn’t mean anything. It is a term called an eponym. Traditionally, in anatomy the person who first discovered or described an anatomical structure was honored by having that structure named after them. Bartolommeo Eustachi (Eustachius), a sixteenth century Italian anatomist, described the tube that […]

— Bill Dyche

Anatomy word of the month: buccinator

The “trumpeter” in Latin. Our cheek muscles, the buccinator, assist the tongue during chewing movements to hold food between our teeth. Otherwise food would accumulate between our cheek and gums making chewing much less efficient and much more frustrating to accomplish. The buccinator muscles also hold in our cheeks during whistling and forceful blowing through […]

— Bill Dyche

Welcome to Des Moines!

Orientation for osteopathic medicine, podiatric medicine, physical therapy, anatomy and biomedical science students starts August 3, and the physician assistant students have been in class since the beginning of June, so campus is starting to get busy! If you are just moving to Des Moines and getting settled into a new city, here are some […]

— Andrea Cooley

Anatomy word of the month: acromion

Feel that bump on the top of your shoulder? This is the highest point of your shoulder and is the exact meaning of the term combining two Greek words meaning “tip, summit or extreme” and “shoulder”. In some individuals their growth hormone continues to overproduce after they have become mature but their long bones have […]

— Bill Dyche

Don’t miss Discover DMU!

Ever wonder what it’s really like to be a student at Des Moines University? Are you interested in checking out our campus and labs and visiting with faculty and students? If so, Discover DMU is the event for you! Our next Discover DMU is Wednesday, June 30 at 2:00 p.m. Discover DMU is informal yet […]

— Katie Pearce

Anatomy word of the month: uvula

The little fleshy appendage hanging from the back of your soft palate is called the “little grape” in Latin. As part of the palate the uvula helps seal off your nasal cavity from your throat cavity during swallowing. This works very well, except when you vomit! When the doctor asks you to say “aaah”, he […]

— Bill Dyche

DMU graduated 453 at 110th commencement May 29

Des Moines University (DMU) awarded 466 degrees at its 2010 Commencement service May 29 at 10 a.m. at the Polk County Convention Complex, 501 Grand Ave.  The dean from each of the three DMU colleges presented their classes and DMU interim president, Stephen S. Dengle, M.B.A., conferred degrees. Continuing a tradition started in 1899, the […]

— Courtney Tompkins

DMU to give 466 degrees Saturday at 110th commencement ceremony

Des Moines University (DMU) will award 466 degrees at its 2010 Commencement service May 29 at 10 a.m. at the Polk County Convention Complex, 501 Grand Ave. The dean from each of the three DMU colleges will present their classes and DMU interim president, Stephen S. Dengle, M.B.A., will confer degrees. Visit www.dmu.edu/commencement for a […]

— Courtney Tompkins

Anatomy word of the month: decussation

“To make an X” (Latin). A decussation is an intersection of pathways in the form of an X. Most nerve pathways between our brain and spinal cord cross over at some point.This accounts for why each side of our brain (two cerebral hemispheres) has control over the opposite side of our body. In anatomical language […]

— Bill Dyche

Annual DMU memorial service May 21 for body donors free, open to public

(Des Moines, IA) – On Friday, May 21, Des Moines University (DMU) will honor 65 Iowans who donated their bodies to further medical education. The family of each donor, the DMU community and the public is invited to remember and recognize each generous gift. The non-denominational service will begin at 1 p.m. in the Student […]

— Courtney Tompkins

The Bodies exhibit!

The human body is a beautiful, amazing thing! I’m always interested to learn more about how it works and what it really all  looks like under the skin. For that reason I’m excited to hear the “BODIES” exhibition is coming to Omaha, which isn’t that far away. It’s an exhibit of real human bodies preserved […]

— Courtney Tompkins

DMU supports World Triathlon with global health outreach

Nearly 830 women die in Nepal for every 100,000 live births. This is the 16th worst maternal mortality rate in the world. So when Dr. Yogesh Shah, associate dean of global affairs for Des Moines University, met Charlie Wittmack, a world class adventurer, speaker, educator, attorney and family man planning a first-of-its-kind intercontinental triathlon that […]

— Courtney Tompkins

Anatomy word of the month: spleen

The name is a direct borrowing from the Greek word splen.  The spleen is located in the upper left quadrant of the abdomen behind the stomach. Despite its location, it has nothing to do with digestion, but works in regulating blood components, particularly, culling out aging red blood cells.  At one time this organ was thought […]

— Bill Dyche

There’s an app for that!

Technology has become an essential part of many of our lives and medical students are no exception. DMU osteopathic medicine, podiatric medicine and physician assistant students receive iPod Touches which are especially useful while they are on rotations. Jonathan Thompson, D.P.M.’12 shares five of his favorite medical apps: ePocrates Price: Free Info: A must-have in […]

— Andrea Cooley

Anatomy word of the month: jugular

This is the major vein in the neck draining blood most importantly from inside the skull. The Latin jugulummeant “the throat, yoke or collar”. The ancient Greeks referred to this structure as the “sacrificial vein”, likely a reference to cutting the throat of animals sacrificed to their gods.

— Bill Dyche

Discover DMU!

Have you ever gone on a campus tour and felt like you didn’t really get to see the heart and guts of the school? We don’t want that to happen at DMU. We also don’t want you to visit and leave without every question answered. So if you’re thinking you want to enter the health […]

— Gina Smith

Anatomy word of the month: hiatus

The Latin word for “an opening, a gaping mouth”.  The diaphragm, the muscular partition that divides the chest from the abdomen, has three openings.  The aorta, esophagus and inferior vena cava each pass through a hiatus in the diaphragm.  You likely have seen this word before when your favorite TV show took a break for […]

— Bill Dyche

Anatomy word of the month: achilles tendon

The Achilles tendon attaches major calf muscles, the gastrocnemius and soleus, to the calcaneous (heel bone). Achilles was a famous Greek warrior whose mother was one of the immortals, but he was not. His mother sought to protect her son by dipping him in the River Styx, which was believed to have magical powers. She […]

— Bill Dyche