Anatomy News and Updates

Attack of the body-snatchers

Students in DMU’s clinical programs and master of science in anatomy program are privileged to begin exploring the body and performing dissections on donated bodies in their first semester, but that wasn’t the case in past centuries: The inability of medical schools and scientists to acquire specimens, the lack of legislation and regulation of body […]

— Barb Boose

Under your skin

Ever wonder what your body looks like with no skin? Well, you’re in luck because the Science Center of Iowa is hosting the lauded BODY WORLDS Vital traveling exhibit starting this Saturday, May 7. Real donated human bodies are preserved through plastination and will be on display for guests to get a glimpse at what […]

— Nicole Branstad

Anatomy word of the month: pylorus

The “gatekeeper” in Greek. This ring of muscle tissue surrounds the juncture between the stomach and the first part of the small intestine, the duodenum. It functions as a gatekeeper by preventing food from exiting the stomach until it has reached a thick, soup-like consistency. Stomach contents called chyme, “juice” in Greek, then is squirted […]

— Bill Dyche

Anatomy word of the month: cadaver

“To fall”, “to perish” in Latin. Many terms are used for a dead body some more irreverent than others: the decedent, a corpse, a stiff, a cadaver. But only the last word is exclusively used for a body that has been preserved for dissection. Although atlases, highly realistic models, and computer simulations have supplemented even […]

— Bill Dyche

Feeding the students!

On March 9, 6 p.m., DMU’s Significant Others Support (SOS) organization will host “Feed the Students.” While SOS performs many volunteer activities in the community, this one focuses on supporting those closest to us, the students! This event consists of SOS members cooking a large quantity of food offsite and providing it, with all the […]

— Michael Drnec

Anatomy word of the month: crista galli

The “cock’s comb” is a wedge of bone found on the anterior floor inside of the skull in the midline. The meninges (protective membranes surrounding the brain) are anchored anteriorly at this point. The Latin name for the group of animals including chickens and turkeys is galliformes. Those imaginative ancient anatomists thought that the vertical, […]

— Bill Dyche

Moving to Des Moines

There are so many things to consider when picking your next place to live. Here’s a nice blog on things to consider about your potential new neighborhood! I know students for the incoming classes are already asking current students for recommendations on where to live. What other info should we share with these new-to-Des Moines […]

— Courtney Tompkins

Won’t you be ours?

Happy valentine’s day, lovely readers! On this day of warm fuzzies and mushiness, let us be clear in how much we appreciate you all. Whether you are a student, staff member, grad, patient or friend of the University, we are thankful to have you in the DMU family! Now remember to spend some time with […]

— Courtney Tompkins

Anatomy word of the month: retinaculum

A “cord or cable” in Latin. Retinacula are thickenings of tissue underneath your skin that serve to bind down tendons of muscles so they don’t “bowstring” at certain joints, meaning pop up when the joint is flexed or extended. For example, there is a retinaculum on the underside of your wrist that keeps tendons from […]

— Bill Dyche

When you’re stressed, you…

Do what? How do you react? Do you eat (healthy comfort food ideas for my fellow emotional eaters)? Listen to music, stop what you’re doing and tune out for awhile? Work out? Here’s a list of 25 stress-relievers. Share your tips!

— Courtney Tompkins

Anatomy word of the month: bursa

A bursa, latin for a little bag or purse, is a closed fluid-filled sack that is typically found in places where a tendon crosses a bone or a muscle comes in contact with bone. It acts as a shock absorber and protection against friction damage to tendons, primarily. They are found in and around our […]

— Bill Dyche

Connected?

How many ways are you connected to DMU? We’d love for you to check out our Facebook page, watch our YouTube vids & follow us on Twitter. Another other cool thing to check out – our campus tour in photos.

— Courtney Tompkins

Great PharmFree grade!

Last week the American Medical Student Association (AMSA) released the results of its fourth “PharmFree Scorecard” project. The AMSA PharmFree Scorecard (http://www.amsascorecard.org) offers a comprehensive national overview as well as an in-depth school-by-school analysis in 11 areas, including gifts and meals from industry to doctors, paid promotional speaking for industry, acceptance of free drug samples, interaction with sales […]

— Courtney Tompkins

The ulna is connected to the…

This is a sweet new Google tool that could be pretty handy for our incoming pre-med students, or really anyone interested in health. (You may need to download the new beta version of Google’s Chrome browser to make it work.) You can choose to view just the nervous system or skeletal system, view several systems […]

— Courtney Tompkins

Holiday hours

Don’t forget: the University is closed Dec. 23-26 but will re-open Dec. 27. It will then be closed again Dec. 30-Jan. 1. The halls get pretty quiet around here on those days in between so we’ll probably cya all in January!

— Courtney Tompkins