Anatomy News and Updates

Anatomy word of the month: Buccinator

The “trumpeter” in Latin. Our cheek muscles, the buccinator, assist the tongue during chewing movements to hold food between our teeth. Otherwise food would accumulate between our cheek and gums making chewing much less efficient and much more frustrating to accomplish.  The buccinator muscles also hold in our cheeks during whistling and forceful blowing through […]

— Bill Dyche

A tale of two tracheas

Reporter and National Public Radio science correspondent Robert Krulwich recently shared a suspenseful and true story about a woman in Barcelona struck by tuberculosis. Rather than have her left lung removed, she agreed to receive a transplanted trachea. The woman, Claudia Castillo, would be a pioneer: She was going to receive a donated trachea that […]

— Barb Boose

Community Ambassador Program – Spring 2012

The Community Ambassador Program (CAP) at Des Moines University offers area students – grade school through college – opportunities to learn about various health and medical topics and issues. Schools and classes that participated in CAP in recent months include the following: Students of Southeast Ankeny Elementary School enjoyed a CAP presentation on January 9, […]

— Linda Jensen

Anatomy word of the month: Decussation

“To make an X” (Latin). A decussation is an intersection of pathways in the form of an X. Most nerve pathways between our brain and spinal cord cross over at some point. This accounts for why each side of our brain (two cerebral hemispheres) has control over the opposite side of our body. In anatomical […]

— Bill Dyche

Anatomy word of the month: Cruciate ligaments

“Cross-shaped” in Latin. In the knee joint are two ligaments that cross over each other, the anterior and posterior cruciate ligaments. These ligaments help stabilize the joint, in particular, to prevent the femur (thigh bone) from slipping too far forward or backward on the tibia (leg bone). The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is frequently torn […]

— Bill Dyche