Friday recipe: tofu sesame almond cookies

February 24, 2012 —

I had the great pleasure last week of observing a nutrition/healthy cooking class taught in the University’s wellness center kitchen by David Spreadbury, Ph.D., chair of biochemistry and nutrition; Wayne Wilson, Ph.D., associate professor of biochemistry and nutrition; and Joy Schiller, M.S., CHES, wellness program director. This very popular elective lets osteopathic medical students apply their knowledge of nutrition in preparing healthy, delicious meals. Their experiences, the students agree, will help them counsel their future patients on diets and dishes that are healthful, delicious, affordable and not too complicated or time-consuming to prepare. Plus students in the class get a really wonderful meal every week.

Last week’s meal had an Asian theme, serving up spring rolls with peanut dipping sauce, miso soup, Oriental steamed green beans, vegetable stir fry and steamed fish. The tastes and smells were heavenly. While everything was delicious, I found one of the desserts served to be most creative. Who knew tofu could create such yummy cookies?

Tofu sesame almond cookies

Transform tofu into this tasty treat.

  • 3/4 cup whole-wheat pastry flour
  • 3/4 cup unbleached white flour
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1/8 teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1/4 cup sesame seeds, toasted
  • 3/4 cup roasted almonds, coarsely chopped
  • 4 ounces silken tofu
  • 1/2 cup canola oil
  • 3/4 cup light brown sugar, packed
  • 1 tablespoon almond extract

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. In a bowl, stir together the flours, baking powder and salt. Mix in the sesame seeds and chopped almonds.

In another bowl, mash the tofu and combine with the canola oil, sugar and almond extract. Mix well.

Fold the wet ingredients into the flour mixture. Roll the mixture into one-inch balls, flatten between your palms and place them on ungreased baking sheets. Bake the cookies about 10 minutes, until the edges begin to brown. Remove from the baking sheet to cool on a rack. Makes four dozen.

Nutritional info per cookie: calories, 86.1; protein, 1.1 g; fat, 6.4 g; carbohydrates, 6.7 g; fiber, 0.6 g; cholesterol, 0 mg.


Endlessly curious and easily entertained, Barb Dietrich Boose loves being a member of the friendly, fascinating DMU community and its creative communications team. The University's publications director and DMU Magazine editor, Barb is always on the hunt for story ideas, good books and new recipes to try out on her family, such as her surprisingly tasty pork-and-bean bars.

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