Friday recipe: healthified broccoli cauliflower gratin

May 13, 2011 —

Cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, kale, cabbage and bok choy are superheroes of health, because they contain vitamins, fiber and disease-fighting phytochemicals. Health agencies recommend that we eat several servings per week of these super-veggies, so this week I’m calling for cauliflower. Several dozen studies link cauliflower-containing diets to cancer prevention, because it provides special nutrient support for three body systems that are closely connected with cancer development as well as cancer prevention – the body’s detox system, its antioxidant system and its inflammatory/anti-inflammatory system.

Whole Foods offers a simple and delicious cauliflower recipe: Steam a pound a cauliflower florets and a teaspoon of turmeric – one of my favorite spices – in five tablespoons of chicken or vegetable broth for no more than five minutes in a covered skillet. For an even more flavor-packed treat, bolstered by broccoli, try this delicious recipe from DMU colleague Kelli Olson.

Healthified broccoli cauliflower gratin

  • 1 small head cauliflower (9 oz.)
  • 1 small head broccoli (9 oz.)
  • 1/2 cup natural low fat yogurt (organic works well)
  • 1 cup grated reduced fat cheddar cheese or Mexican mix cheese
  • 3/4 teaspoon Dijon mustard or 1 teaspoon whole-grain mustard, per your preference
  • 2 tablespoons whole-meal breadcrumbs
  • Salt and black pepper

Break the cauliflower and broccoli into florets and cook in lightly salted boiling water for 8-10 minutes, until just tender. Drain well and transfer to a flameproof dish.

Mix together the yogurt, grated cheese and mustard, then season the mixture with salt and pepper and spoon over the cauliflower and broccoli. Sprinkle the breadcrumbs over the top and place under a moderately hot grill until golden brown. Or bake in a 425-degree oven for about a half hour. Serve hot.

Per each of four portions: 144 calories, 6.5 grams fat, 3.25 grams saturated fat, 16.5 mg. cholesterol and 3.25 grams fiber.


Endlessly curious and easily entertained, Barb Dietrich Boose loves being a member of the friendly, fascinating DMU community and its creative communications team. The University's publications director and DMU Magazine editor, Barb is always on the hunt for story ideas, good books and new recipes to try out on her family, such as her surprisingly tasty pork-and-bean bars.