Current read: The Omnivore’s Dilemma

June 22, 2010 —

Have you ever read a book that has affected you in some way?

My current read is the Omnivore’s Dilemma by Michael Pollan and I’m only about halfway through it. I am really enjoying the book because it talks about my favorite subject, food, and the agricultural industry too.

There were moments in the book where I felt compelled to be vegetarian but have come to the conclusion that eating meat is not bad as long as the animal was treated right.

The book also reveals some startling facts regarding the food industry and how consumers are blinded by the source of their food and how it was produced – and how interesting that this is completely acceptable! For instance, how many cows goes into one McDonald’s hamburger? Before reading this book, I didn’t even know a hamburger could be from several cows! Or that a chicken nugget is hardly made from a chicken. There is a big mention of Iowa and corn (no surprise) but it is surprising to learn how corn really is everywhere in your food and even in your gasoline.

As health care workers we will be asked to give nutrition and health advice (ok, maybe not as often for us podiatric docs!) so we should be up on all the aspects of eating. Have you read this book? What is your interpretation of the dilemma?


Tea Nguyen is a dual degree D.P.M./M.P.H. student at DMU. She was born in Utah but raised in California and left the great state to be at one of the best podiatry school in the country.

She has aspirations in international medical service trips and hopes to hit several continents during this lifetime. Traveling is also on the top of her to-do list and she often reminisces about her prior travels to Italy, France and Greece. She also enjoys eating adventures with her boyfriend Paul and is a major food-snacker. It is not uncommon to find her lapsed in a food coma in the middle of her studies.

Comments

  • Brian Ferguson

    Hi Tea,

    I read this book as well and I must say I had a much more definitive and resounding impression from the read. I too agree with your statement as being expected as health care workers to provide for medical, hence nutritional, advice; however our obligation to stay well read on these ‘heathy’ practices goes much higher than just some expectation to regurgitate information to our patients.

    This book is dry and technical in many areas, and thus off-putting to the typical contemporary reader-but as you have implied much of the information, its implications, and conclusions, are to say the least: alarming. This book is a very decent read, one in which the reader comes away with quite an amount of worthwhile time spent. I will be attending DMU in the coming months, happy to hear there are students here who also carry a propensity for learning beyond the call of duty. Reading is our gift as a civilization.