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Online Learning

Opportunities for AOA Members

If you are an AOA member, you can take advantage of these online continuing education opportunities. You must have an AOA number to participate.

Autism

Kara Thompson, D.O., Des Moines University

1.0 hour of AOA Category 1-A – $10

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and autism are both general terms for a group of complex disorders of brain development. These disorders are characterized, in varying degrees, by difficulties in social interaction, verbal and nonverbal communication and repetitive behaviors. ASD can be associated with intellectual disability, difficulties in motor coordination and attention and physical health issues such as sleep and gastrointestinal disturbances. Some persons with ASD excel in visual skills, music, math and art. Autism appears to have its roots in very early brain development. However, the most obvious signs of autism and symptoms of autism tend to emerge between two and three years of age.

Disaster, Crisis Management and Innovation in a Chilean Mine

J.D. Polk, D.O., Des Moines University

1.0 hour of AOA Category 1-A – $10

Thirty-three men are trapped in a mine 2,400 feet below solid rock. Ages range from 19 to 62. Known medical conditions in some of the miners are Type 2 diabetes, silicosis, hypertension, coronary disease and COPD. NASA was consulted and involved in the rescue of the 33 Chilean miners. In this session, Dr. Polk, former chief, Space Medicine, NASA Johnson Space Center, goes over the many facets of physiology and emergency and disaster medicine that were considered and used to affect one of the most audacious rescues in history. The session reviews the implications for blast over pressure on the human body, the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of refeeding syndrome, the implications of orthostatic hypotension and the nuances and implications of rescue and cage design.

Chronic Non-Malignant Pain

Joshua Stubblefield, D.O., Broadlawns Medical Center

2.0 hours of AOA Category 1-A – $20

This course reviews the current evidence-based standards for chronic pain evaluation, management and documentation. Health care providers should be able to compare their current practices with these recommendations and make any changes as they see necessary to improve their management of this important and prevalent condition. This two-part lecture satisfies the license requirement from the Iowa Board of Medicine regarding chronic pain management. 

Pain Management

These webinars are hosted by the American Medical Association. Access to the webinars are free; however, you will need to register in order to claim CME credit. The cost is $6.

Pain is one of the most common reasons for patients to seek medical attention and one of the most prevalent medical complaints in the US; 9 out of 10 Americans aged 18 or older suffer pain at least once a month, and 42% experience it every day. In America, approximately 116 million Americans are burdened with chronic pain. Physicians and other practitioners need education to assist in developing the skills needed to evaluate and manage patients with pain.

Credit:

  • 1.0 Credit AMA PRA Category 1 Credit
  • AMA Certificate of Participation for non-physicians

Module 02 – Pain Management – Overview of Management Options

Effective pain management presents a significant challenge for physicians, other healthcare professionals and their patients. Pain is one of the most common reasons for patients to seek medical attention and one of the most prevalent medical complaints in the US; 9 out of 10 Americans aged 18 or older suffer pain at least once a month, and 42% experience it every day. In America, more than 116 million Americans are burdened with chronic pain alone. Consequently, physicians and other practitioners need education to assist in developing the skills needed to evaluate and manage patients with pain.

Credit:

  • 2.0 Credit AMA PRA Category 1 Credit
  • AMA Certificate of Participation for non-physicians
Pain is one of the most common reasons for patients to seek medical attention and one of the most prevalent medical complaints in the US. Managing pain in special populations can be particularly challenging. Accordingly, physicians and other healthcare providers need education to address prevailing attitudes towards pain, because physician and patient views can present barriers to optimal pain management. Physicians and other healthcare professionals also need education to assist in developing the skills required to evaluate and manage pain in special populations, such as racial and ethnic minorities.

Credit:

  • 1.0 Credit AMA PRA Category 1 Credit
  • AMA Certificate of Participation for non-physicians
Pain is one of the most common reasons for patients to seek medical attention and one of the most prevalent medical complaints in the US. Patients with a history of substance use disorders including addiction are at increased risk of receiving inadequate pain management. When opioid therapy generally is indicated, such as the context of pain related to advanced cancer, undertreatment may occur because of a fear of exacerbating addiction and a lack of adequate training. Inadequate training in pain management and addiction medicine and a fear of regulatory sanctions contribute to undertreatment. All patients who are prescribed opioids (or other controlled substances) should be routinely evaluated for drug-related behaviors throughout the course of treatment. Consequently, healthcare professionals need to develop the skills to evaluate and manage pain in patients at risk for substance abuse and in those with addictive disorders, or be prepared to refer such patients for appropriate treatment.

Credit:

  • 1.0 Credit AMA PRA Category 1 Credit
  • AMA Certificate of Participation for non-physicians
Older adults are at risk of inadequate pain management, with age-related factors affecting pain management. Some 25% to 50% of community-dwelling seniors have pain that interferes with normal function. Pain is one of the most common reasons for patients to seek medical attention and one of the most prevalent medical complaints in the US. According to the 2011 Institute of Medicine Report-Relieving Pain In America, more than 116 million Americans are burdened with chronic pain alone. Three in five of those 65 years or older said that they experienced pain that lasted a year or more; more than 60% of U.S. nursing home residents report pain, most commonly attributable to arthritis, and 17% have substantial daily pain.

Credit:

  • 1.25 Credit AMA PRA Category 1 Credit
  • AMA Certificate of Participation for non-physicians
The pediatric population is at risk of inadequate pain management, with age-related factors affecting pain management in children. Misconceptions exist that may contribute to pediatric patients receiving inadequate analgesia for procedures that would routinely be treated aggressively in adults. Although much is now known about pain management in children, improvements are still needed to improve pediatric pain management in routine clinical practice.

Credit:

  • 1.0 Credit AMA PRA Category 1 Credit
  • AMA Certificate of Participation for non-physicians
Unrelieved chronic or persistent pain is a significant public health problem in the U.S., with prevalence estimates ranging from 15% to 30%. A World Health Organization (WHO) survey of primary care patients found 21.5% suffered severe pain for most of a 6-month period during the previous year. Persistent pain significantly impacts quality-of-life and is often accompanied by anxiety, depression and sleep disorders, all of which complicate management.

Credit:

  • 2.0 Credit AMA PRA Category 1 Credit
  • AMA Certificate of Participation for non-physicians
Traditionally, pain has been treated as a symptom, which is appropriate in the context of acute injury or disease. However, once the injury has healed or the disease has subsided, patients may be left with persistent pain. This CME program will address nonmalignant or “noncancer” pain—a group of complex disorders that may be related to a specific disease process; occur following injury to bone, joint, soft tissue, viscera, or nerve; or result from poorly understood psychological practices.

Credit:

  • 1.25 Credit AMA PRA Category 1 Credit
  • AMA Certificate of Participation for non-physicians
Neuropathic pain is one of the most common types of pain, but it is often under-recognized and under-treated. It is defined by the International Association for the Study of Pain as pain “initiated or caused by a primary lesion or dysfunction in the nervous system.”

Credit:

  • 1.0 Credit AMA PRA Category 1 Credit
  • AMA Certificate of Participation for non-physicians
Cancer associated pain can be characterized as either acute nociceptive pain (with or without inflammatory components) or as persistent pain associated with neoplastic disease. A subset of patients (~25%) experiences persistent pain as a consequence of antineoplastic treatment. Recognition of these syndromes can guide additional clinical assessment and treatment. In patients with active cancer, the management of persistent pain is an essential element in a comprehensive strategy of palliative care, which emphasizes multidimensional assessment and the coordinated use of treatments that mitigate suffering and provide support to the patient and family (see Module 12). The treatment principles applicable to persistent cancer pain also apply to other types of persistent pain associated with progressive, potentially life limiting disorders.

Credit:

  • 0.75 Credit AMA PRA Category 1 Credit
  • AMA Certificate of Participation for non-physicians
From 15% to more than 75% of patients with solid tumors experience clinically significant chronic pain, depending on tumor type, extent of disease, and many other factors. Most patients with advanced cancer require treatment for pain. Many patients who have been successfully treated for cancer may have persistent pain. Based on the existing guidelines for the relief of cancer pain, 70% to 90% of patients can obtain good pain relief with oral analgesics if administered as recommended. Despite the availability of effective treatments cancer pain remains undertreated.

Credit:

  • 1.5 Credit AMA PRA Category 1 Credit
  • AMA Certificate of Participation for non-physicians
Most patients with advanced cancer (60% to 80%) require treatment for pain. Pain may be experienced in many patients with earlier stages of cancer or who have been successfully treated but have persistent pain. Effective management for cancer-related pain is well established and guidelines exist for its treatment, which have been endorsed by the World Health Organization (WHO) and other professional societies and government agencies. Despite the availability of effective treatments, cancer pain remains undertreated.
Credit:
  • 0.75 Credit AMA PRA Category 1 Credit
  • AMA Certificate of Participation for non-physicians

IAMSE Webinar Series

DNA Methylation in Substance Use: Focus on Smoking

Speaker: Robert Philibert, M.D., Ph.D., professor of Psychiatry and director of the Psychiatric Genetics Laboratory, University of Iowa

Objectives

  1. Describe the two principal forms of epigenetic modifications to DNA.
  2. State the importance of DNA Methylation in gene regulation.
  3. Integrate DNA methylation measures into the possible repertoire of tools for the assessments of patients.

Resources

Medical Terminology Course

By request DMU now offers certificates of participation for the online medical terminology course. Registrants will receive a certificate of participation for 1.75 contact hours – no credentials or diploma will be awarded.

Register to receive a certificate ($50)

A Comparison of Health Care Use for Physician-Referred and Self-Referred Episodes of Outpatient Physical Therapy

Speaker: Pamela A. Duffy, PT, PhD, OCS, CPC, RP, assistant professor, Master of Public Health and Global Health

Objectives

  1. Define various the importance of health services research.
  2. Describe the significant differences between physician-referred and self-referred episodes of physical therapy services.
  3. Distinguish between cost-effectiveness and resource-use of health services.
  4. Identify relevant health services research topics.

Resources

Faculty development

The Alpha and Omega of the Clinical Rotation

Dana Shaffer, D.O.; Senior associate dean of Clinical Affairs

  • Explain the importance of a short but effective orientation for every DMU student
  • List items that should be covered in orientation
  • State the importance of ongoing feedback to each learner
  • Review of the competency based evaluation and assessment tool used by DMU-COM

Download “The Alpha and Omega of the Clinical Rotation” slides

Developing Clinical Teaching Skills

Luke Mortensen, Ph.D., FAHA, EMT; Professor of Pharmacology and Physiology

  • Identify key elements of excellence in clinical training
  • Engage in opportunities for self-exploration and self-assessment regarding teaching characteristics and behaviors
  • Examine qualities of outstanding learners
  • Examine the conditions that promote stimulating and “safe” learning environments
  • Identify key elements of a teaching/learning encounter

View recording – duration: 0:52:45

Download “Developing Clinical Teaching Skills” slides

Providing Appropriate Feedback

Luke Mortensen, Ph.D., FAHA, EMT; Professor of Pharmacology and Physiology

  • Define feedback
  • Explain why feedback is important
  • Describe the elements of effective feedback
  • Employ behaviors used to give effective feedback

View recording – duration: 0:50:03

Download “Providing Appropriate Feedback” slides

JAOA continuing medical education quizzes

The JAOA continuing medical education quizzes are for AOA members only.

The purpose of the monthly JAOA-The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association continuing medical education (CME) quiz is to provide readers with a convenient means of self-assessment for their understanding of the scientific content in the current month’s issue of the JAOA. In addition, members of the American Osteopathic Association (AOA) can apply for two (2) hours of Category 1-B CME credit for completing a JAOAquiz.

AOA members can visit www.do-online.org/cme, where this and other JAOA quizzes can be accessed. Quizzes that are completed online will be graded and credited to members’ CME activity reports. Quiz answers for the JAOA and its supplements are available in the JAOA one month after quizzes are published.

Working Effectively with Medical Interpreters

Objectives

  1. State the differences between interpreters and translators.
  2. Recognize the role that language plays in affecting health status.
  3. Learn specific skills that can improve a provider’s effectiveness when working with medical interpreters.

Faculty

Michele Devlin, Dr.P.H., professor and director, Iowa Center on Health Disparities

Mark Grey, Ph.D., professor and director, Iowa Center on Immigrant Leadership and Integration, University of Northern Iowa

Audio – mms://streamer.dmu.edu/bb/Medical_Interpreters.mp3